Macintosh Color Classic

Macintosh Color Classic

W_LeMay
This is a model of a Macintosh Color Classic (also sold under the name “Performa 250”), which was released by Apple in February, 1993 and discontinued in May of 1994. This was the last computer Apple made (along with the Color Classic II) that used a similar form factor to that of the original 1984 Macintosh, though it was substantially modified to incorporate a 10" Color Sony Trinitron CRT Monitor, which was crisp and clear, and also able to display more colors at higher resolutions than the computer's infamously crippled original hardware allowed. Aimed at educational markets and middle-class households, this computer was relatively popular for the time it was produced, especially in Japan and Europe, where its small size allowed it to easily fit into crowded living spaces, and in the US it was used by schools because it allowed for more computers to fit in limited classroom space, especially in older facilities without a dedicated computer lab. The computer was replaced by the LC/Performa 500 series in May, 1994, which used a similarly styled case design, but was larger, with a 15" monitor and had a less refined, more chaotic appearance, looking less like a whole, unlike the Color Classic, and more like three separate parts. These computers similarly proved popular in similar markets, and were more popular among North American consumers than the Color Classic had been due to their relatively compact footprint, simple design, decent hardware and larger monitor, as well as the inclusion of a CD Drive. The 500 series was in turn superseded by the larger and more monolithic (and in my opinion, ugly) Performa/LC/Power Macintosh 5000 series in 1995. In 1998, the 5000 series was superseded by the iMac, which today continues to be produced after going through many iterations, but remains the descendant of this machine, which was the first all-in-one color computer that Apple produced. Today, these are highly prized by collectors and have become pretty rare due to many being thrown away at the end of their lifecycles by families and educational institutions without regarding the demand for these on the second-hand market. They often fetch prices over $200, mainly due to their scarcity and enduring popularity. This model is a very close representation of the actual thing. It is really impressive that I was able to get this level of detail into this model, considering I have never actually seen a Macintosh Color Classic in real life. I am also pretty sure that the mouse was the later version that was rounded, but I couldn't find a model of one and decided not to make one, as it doesn’t look as good with the keyboard as the boxier Apple Desktop Bus mouse from the mid-1980s. Credit goes to 3dniels for the Mouse, Lewis for the Classic Apple Logo, and Allen M. for the Keyboard. Feel free to use this model as you see fit, on the condition that you contact me first so I know where it is being used (I'd love to see it wherever it ends up), and give me a mention or credit wherever it is used or published. #Apple #Macintosh #VintageComputing #Computer
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