Buckman Tavern - Lexington, Massachusetts

Buckman Tavern - Lexington, Massachusetts

Ron Hall 76
Buckman Tavern is an integral and important part of the historical setting of the first conflict of the War for American Independence, and it appears in the background of nearly every illustration depicting the brief fight between the British light infantry and the minutemen. One of Lexington's better hostelries, it was built about 1690 by Benjamin Muzzey, who in 1693 received a license to maintain a public house. In 1775 it was owned and operated by John Buckman, a member of the Lexington Minuteman Company, and was a favorite gathering place for the citizen-soldiers on days when they trained on the Lexington Green. Captain Parker's minutemen assembled at the tavern during the night and early morning as Major Pitcairn's British regulars approached from Boston, and the building still exhibits scars left by British musket balls fired at Parker's men drawn up on the Green. Buckman Tavern housed the first village store in Lexington, and later, in 1812, the first town post office.The interior of Buckman Tavern appears today very much as it did on that fateful morning in 1775, having been restored in the 1920′s by the Lexington Historical Society. During this restoration, the original seven foot-wide taproom fireplace was rediscovered and the bar was reinstalled. Among the many items on display is the old front door, with its bullet hole made by a British musket ball during the Battle. #1776 #American_history #American_Revolution #Freedom_Trail #Lexington_Historical_Society #Minutemen #tavern
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