Ontonagon Lighthouse

Ontonagon Lighthouse

john S.
The U.S. Department of Commerce, Lighthouse Service, acquired the land for the lighthouse in 1847. The money for construction was appropriated in 1850 and the first structure was built in 1851-1852. By 1866, the original wood structure was replaced with the existing building, a simple one and one half story, rectangular, cream brick building with a square light tower at the North end. The extremely high basement was built to protect the living areas from flooding. The light tower is three stories high, or 39 feet from the water to the focal plane, and is surmounted by an iron decagonal beacon house, which housed the fifth order Fresnel lens and light. Around the beacon house is a square, iron gallery consisting of a platform and rail. In 1890 the 18 foot square, one story brick kitchen of similar construction was added to the south end of the house. In 1901-1902 the oil storage house was built. In April 1963, use of the lighthouse was discontinued after an automatic foghorn was installed in the West Pier Light, and a battery powered light was installed at the end of the East Pier. The lighthouse was officially decommissioned on January 1, 1964. Arnold Huuki, the last lightkeeper, was given a lifetime lease on the building. The light and 5th order Fresnel lens were removed and are now at the Ontonagon County Historical Society Museum. Textured with present day photos. Modeled using dimensions from original blue prints. #Fifth_Order_Fresnel_Lens #Historical_landmark #Historical_Lighthouse #Lighthouse #Michigan #Ontonagon #Restored_Lighthouse
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