Michigan central station

Michigan central station

MILO M.
Michigan Central Station (also known as Michigan Central Depot or MCS), built in 1913 for the Michigan Central Railroad, was Detroit, Michigan's passenger rail depot from its opening in 1913 after the previous Michigan Central Station burned, until the cessation of Amtrak service on January 6, 1988. At the time of its construction, it was the tallest rail station in the world. The building still stands today, though it remains unoccupied. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Restoration projects and plans have gone as far as the negotiation process, but none have come to fruition. The unfinished building began operating as Detroit's main passenger depot in. The old station was to be replaced by the new Michigan Central to place the passenger service on the main line. Even with fewer means to get to and from the station, passenger volume did not decrease immediately. During World War II, the station saw heavy military use, but once the war ended, passenger volume began to decline. Amtrak took over the nation's passenger rail service in 1971. A $1.25 million renovation project was begun in 1978. But only 6 years later, the building was sold for a transportation center project that never materialized. Then, on January 6, 1988, the last Amtrak train pulled away from the station after it was decided to close the facility. #1988 #but_once_the_war_ended #monopolycompetition09 #on_January_6 #was_Detroit
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