Sequoyah Hall

Sequoyah Hall

Josh
Sequoyah, Building No. 107, was built in 1961 at a cost of $566,800. It has 12 classrooms, offices, and a library. Sequoyah was dedicated on May 24, 1962. Mrs. Hildegard Thompson, Chief, Branch of Education, presented the Sequoyah name plate. Mr. John O. Crow, deputy commissioner of Bureau of Indian Affairs and Haskell alumnus, gave the dedication address. Sequoyah, who conceived and perfected a syllabary of the Cherokee language, was born the son of a Cherokee mother and white father in Tuskagee, Tennessee, between the years of 1760 and 1775. He made his own Cherokee alphabet with a final syllabary of 86 characters. Each character was used to spell a syllable. He presented his alphabet to the Cherokee National Council and to the public in 1821. The tribe accepted it and they learned to read and write. Congress recognized the greatness of Sequoyah’s accomplishment and rewarded him with an income of $500 a year. In 1828 he was voted a silver metal as a mark of distinction by the tribe. He died in 1843 in Mexico where he was searching for some lost Cherokee tribesmen.. It houses the Science and Math Departments, the GIS Department , and Admissions and Records. #American #building #component #education #geography #gis #Haskell #hinu #history #Indian #Kansas #ku #landmark #Lawrence #model #nation #native #school #sketchup #university
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