Leeds Town Hall

Leeds Town Hall

Damo
Leeds Town Hall was built between 1853 and 1858 on Park Lane (now The Headrow), Leeds, West Yorkshire, England to a design by architect Cuthbert Brodrick. Leeds Town Hall was proposed to represent Leeds' emergence as an important industrial centre during the Industrial Revolution and is a symbol of civic pride and confidence. Leeds Corporation tendered for designs from architects and the contract was won by Cuthbert Brodrick, an unknown architect from Kingston upon Hull who had trained in Paris. Leeds Town Hall is one of the largest town halls in the United Kingdom and as of 2008 it is the eighth tallest building in Leeds. It was opened by Queen Victoria, highlighting its status as an important civic structure. It is a Grade I listed building. The distinctive clock tower, which serves as a symbol of Leeds was not part of the initial design but was added by Brodrick in 1856 as the civic leaders sought to make an even grander statement. The town hall was built to house various council offices, as the new courtroom facility for the city, as a police station or 'central charge office', and to provide a venue for concerts and civic events. The town hall still has a role as a council office, although many departments have been relocated to neighbouring buildings. (An edited description from Wikipedia) #Britain #Brodrick #Cuthbert #Damo #England #Europe #Great #Hall #Kingdom #Leeds #Town #UK #United #West #Yorkshire
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